Category Archives: life as a teacher

Spring Break Quarantine: Week 1

20200318_171023Although I have not traveled outside of the country, my famiy’s spring break trips have been canceled due to threat of the coronavirus. Since we’ve been stuck inside, I took to Facebook and started posted daily quarantine updates in a style I like to think mirrors a Jane Austen heroine.

What follows below are my famiy’s exploits from our first week in quarantine.

Day 1 of Spring Break under quarantine: The day dawned as usual, although it was with a heavy sigh that I lifted myself out of bed. Today I was supposed to embark on an adventure to a Magical Kingdom, but alas, I am relegated to spend the next month at home.

After a morning and afternoon spent trying to sort out various travel issues for my clientele, I was finally able to take a short repose in my favorite chair. I sent the children outdoors for a constitutional, hoping they would stave off cabin fever with a frolic in the snow. My youngest was delighted. My eldest is displaying his dissatisfaction by tossing snowballs at my window and glowering at me. I fear this will be the first of many withering looks in the weeks to come.

As food shortages have already begun at the local markets, I am baking bread.

I have finished reading the first of the novels I plan to read during this long spring. I have high hopes that all will be well.

 

20200315_144241Day 2 of Spring Break Quarantine: Everyone was beyond thrilled when I served bacon for breakfast, since breakfast is usually a rushed affair so that we can be on our way to school and to work.

As a family we took our first daily constitutional around the neighborhood. The wind was bracing and made me long for the tropical climate we were supposed to be experiencing as we toured the world in only a few hours thanks to the magic of Florida. But there is no use bemoaning what should have been. Jumping over mud puddles on our walks will have to suffice as our daily thrill rides.

Later I finished the second of the novels I brought home to read. I also made progress on two other heavier works of non-fiction.

In addition to our twice daily walks, I am also instituting a family game hour. My daughter chose Munchkin Shakespeare and although I should not take quite as much pleasure in this as I do, I trounced both of my children and more than my fair share of Elizabethean monsters.

Dinner was a hearty soup with some of the homemade bread from day before.

The children were enconsed in their beds with little fuss and I settled in to my favorite chair, blanket on my lap to play some virtual cards with dear friends.

 

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Day 3 of Spring Break Quarantine: Books are sustaining us through this long, cold, distance with others. I have finished the three of the books I brought home with me. My son has read twice that number. I fear he will soon run out. And with no libraries to sustain him, madness may set in soon….

I began cleaning our homestead. Although much was accomplished, my work was brought to an abrupt end when I found some mementos of my dear departed father and decided to seek solace under a warm blanket and Netflix.

Our morning constitutional was a success, but sadly as we headed out for our evening waltz around the neighborhood, a light drizzle began to fall and my children stubbornly refused to remain out of doors.

Despite the slight rain, spirits did improve with a delivery from Amazon which brought Nerf guns for my son. He is planning a full scale attack on his friends once this quarantine has been lifted. For now, he seems to be plotting against his sister. At the moment a peace holds, but I can’t help but wonder how long it will last.

 

20200318_103523Day 4 of Spring Break Quarantine: Cabin fever has suddenly set in. The day began with sibling squabbles which culminated in sibling shouting. It was truly much ado about nothing, but it is hard to reason with children in the throws of unreasonable anger.

Tempers cooled and clearer heads prevailed when a Lego challenge was issued. My son took up the gauntlet and created a new roller coaster for a theme park. My daughter created passengers for his ride. A small dose of teamwork brought them together.

Thankfully we were able to take more than just a turn around the room and actually escaped outside for our daily constitutionals. We desperately needed the fresh air and escape from the confines of our humble abode.

I was also able to finish my fourth novel of this quarantine and make impressive progress on The Story of the Trapp Family Singers. Sadly, I did not make as much progress on my Fast and Furious quest. This was due in part to the hour I spent in a Zoom meeting with the dearest companions of my heart. They lifted my weary spirits and made this time apart a bit more bearable.

20200318_171030Day 5 of Spring Break Quarantine: The weather foiled our attempts to get some fresh air. The rain came tumbling down upon us and drove us back indoors. Since it did not cease until after dinner, we were a bit more desolate than usual. The dreary day made our spirits even drearier.

Thankfully a delivery of food arrived from the local market, so I had some beautiful carrots and potatoes to accompany my roast. I also made some biscuits to round out the evening meal.

My daughter decided we needed a special project to busy ourselves, idle hands and all…so she suggested baking cookies. Sugar cookies were her choice so that we could make a thorough mess of the kitchen. They have special unicorn chips in them and are quite tasty. But now we have three dozen cookies and only four of us. Normally I would take these extra goodies into school to share with my students, but alas, since school is not in session and we are quarantined, we will have to put our best effort forward and make sure none of these precious morsels are wasted. In hindsight, I should have frozen half of the dough. Clearly I have not adjusted to this new world we find ourselves in.

My son found solace in his drawing lessons and my daughter in her music. I retreated into books again, and have finished my fifth book during this isolation.

20200319_164603Day 6 of Spring Break Quarantine: Today we actually left our home! What was originally supposed to be our day of rest in between two whirlwhind visits, first with family in the bustling city of Orlando, and then with friends in the quiet countryside of Athens, was instead the first day we’d left our neighborhood in nearly a week.

Fear not dear friends, our sojourn into the world did not put us at risk. We had to pick up some medicine from our local apothocary and also had to stop by the local market to acquire some additional ingredients for our meals. We did not actually venture in to either of these establishments, but waited for our items to be passed to us outside. We were back home in less than half an hour.

We were home in time to take our morning constitutional, which was much needed, especially when the rain picked up again and our evening one had to be forgotten.

After luncheon, we moved to the parlor where we wiled away the afternoon playing games the children invented, which were surprisingly amusing. Later, while the children played more games remotely with their cousins, I found even further entertainment from one of my favorite musical groups, The Indigo Girls. They had a concert in their parlor and invited the world to watch. I was so excited at how so many people who were so very far apart were brought together through the wonders of this modern age. My heart delighted in it and I may have danced in my kitchen.

20200320_105341Day 7 of Spring Break Quarantine: It’s been a week and the days are beginning to blend into one another.

One noticeable difference was that my husband was not needed in town until later in the day, so he spent the morning with us. The children were happy to have some time with their father, and disappointed he had to leave before our morning constitutional around the neighborhood. It was windy and the sky was overcast, but it was suprisingly warm. Although we wore our coats, we almost didn’t need them. It gave me hope that maybe we’d see the sun again soon. My spirits were further lifted when my daughter reached for my son’s hand and he actually let her take it for a few minutes as they walked.

Once home, we sat and wrote letters to some of our nearest and dearest. My daughter was excited to post hers, but was filled with grief when I informed her that her cousins would not get her letter or the game she sent them for several days.

Upon my husband’s arrival back home, we decided to play parlor games. My daugther chose Apples to Apples and we had a delightful time playing with words and clever turns of phrase. Once again, I won, much to my husband’s chagrin.

I was downtrodden when one of the avocados was completely spoiled, but still managed to produce a passable guacamole that my family loved with the remaining fruits. It complemented the tacos perfectly. Even during a pandemic, it is hard to complain when there are tacos.

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Disney’s Polynesian Village Resort:First impressions

20191007_100415As often as I’ve been to Disney World and Disneyland, it wasn’t until I was in my 30’s and had kids of my own that we actually started staying on property. In all fairness, when I was a kid we were annual passholders for Disneyland and lived like 15 minutes away, so it would have been silly to stay at the Disneyland Hotel. Although, when we used to ride the monorail over there to shop, I desperately wanted to.

When we visited Disney World in my late childhood, teens and even as a fairly young adult, I had a great aunt who lived in St. Augustine, about an hour and a half away, so we always stayed for free with her rather than shell out money for a hotel. Once my aunt and I drove to Florida for a girl’s trip and decided to stay in Kissimmee, but it was a super budget trip, so we stayed way down the end of the adventure strip at just about the cheapest motel we could find so that we could focus our funds on park tickets and souvenirs.

So far I’ve stayed in a few of the Value resorts and even a Moderate, but until my latest trip with my mom and sister, I’d only ever seen the Deluxe resorts as we passed by/through them on the monorail. My family was actually supposed to stay at the Polynesian Village Resort on our very first trip, but my mother-in-law, who was booking the trip for us had waited too long and all the standard rooms were sold out. We stayed at Port Orleans French Quarter and while we loved it, I was always so sad that I hadn’t gotten to stay at the Polynesian, since it was a dream from my childhood. Luckily, my mom is all about deluxe accommodations and since it was just going to be the three of us girls, when I mentioned my desire to stay at the Polynesian, she said, “book it!”

20191007_114824From the moment I walked in, I was in love! Like everything at Disney, the theming is spot on. If you want a tropical island getaway without actually having to leave the United States, this is the place. From the tiki torches, lush vegetation, and waterfall that greet you as you get off the Magical Express (or come from the parking lot), to the statue who welcomes you as you enter the lobby (see the picture at the top of the post), to the leis the cast members give you at check in (I picked a pink one, but my mom and sister wanted purple), everything screams tropical island. Ok, maybe not screams it. There is such a relaxed vibe, which is apparent from the moment you step off the bus, that it’s more like it sighs and says, “hey, welcome to vacation, you’re gonna like it here.”

20191007_100439-1The lobby is comfy and believe me, I tested pretty much every chair in it. My flight got in about 3.5 hours before my mom and sister’s did and since our room wasn’t ready yet, I had some time to chill in the lobby. Sure, I could have gone shopping at one of the two stores (one in the lobby and one on the second floor), relaxed by one of the two amazing pools, sunned myself on the chairs on the beach facing the lagoon, played games in the arcade or even hopped on the monorail to check out the other two hotels on the Magic Kingdom monorail circuit, but I also had three sets of essays to grade, so I hunkered down in the lobby and started grading. Luckily several of the lamps in the lobby have USB ports in them and I was able to charge my phone while I waited.

Ok, so I didn’t just sit and grade. That would be a dedication I don’t have on vacation, no matter how comfy the lobby is. I graded for about 30 minutes, then wandered around the hotel for 15-20 minutes, then hunkered down for another grading session. Before doing it all again. So yeah, before my mom and sister arrived I did check out the two stores. I was on a mission to find body wash that my cousin wanted from our last trip to Disney, so I figured I might as well look while I was there. Plus, I knew I’d have to bring some kind of souvenir home for my kids, so what better time to look? I loved the name of the store on the main floor: Boutiki!

20191007_100431It was also during one of these little breaks in grading that I discovered the monorail station on the second floor. And yeah, I did take a break and ride the full circle of it. I hadn’t ridden the resort monorail since I was in my teens and although I knew it stopped at the Polynesian, Grand Floridian Resort and Spa, the Magic Kingdom, the Transportation and Ticket Center, and the Contemporary, I didn’t know the order of things nor did I really remember what the other hotels looked like. Since we were going to be using the monorail to get to The International Food and Wine Festival at Epcot twice during our trip (it was the only park we visited), I figured I should figure out the monorail before my mom arrived so she wouldn’t have to worry about it. If you want to check out the ride, you can watch it on my YouTube channel here. The video starts and ends at the Polynesain with the 3-6 minute stops cut out. The entire ride is about 25 minutes.

20191007_110936After I got back from my ride and did one more round of grading, I decided to explore the grounds just a bit more. My mom and sister had texted that their plane had landed and after I guided them through the airport to the Magical Express (it is easy to find, but my mom is an anxious traveler and she was tired from having been up at 4 am), I set off again. This time I just wanted to explore the beauty of the hotel. Because it is simply a beautiful hotel.

20191007_114753Thanks to Florida’s warm climate, they are able to grow tropical flowers, which are all over the grounds. Everywhere I turned, things were lush and green, which was such a departure from my home in Indiana where we were in the final throes of fall and everything was turning that red it does just before it goes brown and dead.

20191007_105444Plus there were all sorts of fun, decorative surprises as I walked the paths around the hotel. Personally, I love all the cut wood signs that helped make me believe that I was in my own little corner of a Polynesisan island. I may not have actually visited Hawaii yet (it’s my goal for 2021), but just looking around me, I felt like I was there. Everything was straight out of the movies and books I’ve read about the islands. And, it was surprisingly quiet. I realize it was about 1:30 in the afternoon and a lot of people were off exploring the theme parks, but as I wandered the paths which run the rather expansive property, I encountered few people and heard no noises that reminded me of the hectic, citified life I’d left behind. I heard the soft beating of drums and island songs pumped in by the speaker systems threaded throughout the property, but that was about it.

20191007_114812Disney’s Polynesian Village Resort really does offer the tranquility of a peaceful island vacation. Unlike the constant bustle and hum of the Value resorts, from the moment I stepped off the Magical Express, I knew I was on vacation. I felt the tension fly from my shoulders and even grading didn’t seem so ominous or overwhelming. I might not get all those essays graded, but that was ok. I was in paradise.

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Baking for fun…and students

cran apple crisp #2When I make a trip to Tuttles Orchard, it means I have to bake! This is a cranberry apple crisp I made with my delicious bounty of apples.

Although this one looks slightly different, this is also a cranberry apple crisp I made.

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Why make two that are different sizes?

Because this year I gave all of my juniors and seniors a reading challenge. Every year there are 25 YA books on the Eliot Rosewater Award nominee list. Every year I read them all and this year I told any student who also finished the list that I would bake for them. If they finish half of the list, they get a smaller version of the treat.

Well, it’s only November and one of my students rose to my challenge. So she gets her very own cranberry apple crisp. I was out of disposable pans, so I moved it into a disposable plastic container to take to her tomorrow.

For anyone who doubts the dedication of teachers, I would like to say I am not an anomaly. Not every teacher is also a baker, but they are all doing things like this to encourage and challenge kids. Kids are not just a paycheck for us. Nor are they data points on standardized test reports. They are people we care about and go way beyond the extra mile for.

I write this not because I want praise or awards myself, but because I hope people who are not teachers will take just a minute to think about all the extras teachers around the country are doing right now to help kids learn and grow. We are not just in it for the money (we’d be fools if we were). We are invested in our students. And if you are also invested in those students, you should be invested in us too.

Tuesday, November 19th is Red for Ed Action Day at the Indiana Statehouse. Many of your children’s teachers might not be at school that day. But it’s not because we just want a bigger paycheck. It’s not because we don’t think our presence in the classroom is important on that day. It’s not because we are lazy and want a day off. It’s not because we don’t care about your children.

It’s because we care so much. All the things that you want for your kids, we want too. We want our schools to be fully funded. And that doesn’t mean putting that money into our pockets. It means putting it into or schools so that we can fix some of the major shortfalls we are facing. Want to know more about them? Check out this infographic from the Indiana State Teachers Association. My guess is that you’ll be amazed at how bad it has gotten in Indiana.

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And just because I know that some people will want to say, “you knew what you were getting into when you were hired,” I will tell you that no, I didn’t. I was hired 22 years ago, when experience and level of education still factored into our pay scale. I was hired in when Indiana still provided good health care benefits and competitive salaries for our teachers. I was hired in when every year I got at least a cost of living raise for doing my job well. That has not been true in my district since about 2008.

And for those who want to bemoan the fact that teachers get paid even though we get summers off, you need to understand some basic economics. We do not, in fact, get paid for taking the summers off. Our contracts run from the start of school (in my case late July) until the end of school (in my case late May). I have a 10 month contract. My pay is for those 10 months that I work. However, my district (and most) require that our pay be spread out over 12 months. So they are actually withholding our pay from us for two months, not paying us for not working. And I have worked for districts that have not done this. I got a partial paycheck in August and a partial check in June (this school was in session for at least the first week in June), but no check at all in July.

And, after 22 years and a master’s degree, I still have to work additional jobs. Not only am I a Magical Vacation Planner, but I also work for the College Board as an AP Reader. I do these in part because I love them and in part because the small bits of supplemental income help my family. I have two children of my own who are in upper elementary and middle school. One needs braces. One is autistic and needs behavioral therapy. They will both eventually want to drive and go to college and I haven’t even gotten a cost of living raise in about a decade (that does not mean I haven’t gotten any raise, but that my salary has not increased enough to be considered a cost of living raise).

 

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Headed for parts very well-known

DSCN0668This past year has been a whirlwind of travel for me. It seems like every time I turn around I am either planning a trip, taking a trip or just getting back from one. One of my friends jokingly asked me if I planned to spend any time at home this summer. I laughed, and answered, “Maybe a day or two.” In hindsight, I don’t feel like I was that far off.

In the past year, I have been to New Orleans, Las Vegas, North Carolina (twice), Georgia (twice), Florida (twice-once to Disney World and once to Tampa), and Colorado. Looking into this year, I will be heading off to Florida four times (once to Tampa, twice to Disney World and once to Universal Studios), Grand Cayman, Cozumel, Georgia (at least twice), Greece, Italy, and probaby Charleston, South Carolina (once or twice…it’s up in the air right now). I would be heading back to Tampa a second time, but two days would overlap my Greece/Italy trip, so I had to put that trip off another year.

And these are just the trips I have planned. Who knows what other opportunties might present themselves to me.

close up Oxford CakeI’ve always loved to travel and this blog, which I have neglected for WAY TOO LONG, is littered with posts about fun places I’ve discovered while traveling (mostly within the U.S.). I have a habit of finding fun, quirky little corners of the world that far too many other people neglect in their haste to only see the big, splash sights. I love avoiding crowds and seeing quirky things like the Tree That Owns Itself in Athens, Georgia; historical things like Edinburgh Castle in Edinburgh castleScotland; haunting things like The Irish Hunger Memorial in New York City; and delicious things like The Cake Shop in Oxford, England.

It is partly because of my love of actually traveling and partly because of my love for trip planning that I decided to add another hat to the many I already wear and become a Magical Vacation Planner. I spent about a month going through quite a bit of training, taking lots of quizes about amazing destinations, and taking oh so many notes about all the different ways I could help other people make their vacations as magical and as mine have been.

It sounds hokey, I know. But in my 22 years as a teacher, one of my biggest joys has been taking students on trips around the the world. I am just about bursting with excitement about our trip to Greece and Italy this coming June. I can’t wait to start having meetings with my kids so that I can get them every bit as hyped up as I am. I want to help them find the quirky, historical, haunting and delicious parts of the world they didn’t even know existed.

For this reason, becoming a Magical Vacation Planner makes perfect sense to me. Instead of just dreaming about my next big trip somewhere cool, I get to help other people plan their big events. Although I’m just starting out, I am already having so much fun. Today I got to send a client suggestions for places at Disney World where she can surprise her husband with a delicious dinner for his 50th birthday. I also got to give her all kinds of tips for rides that her kids are going to love (it’s their first trip). And, when I put in their reservation, I got to work with Disney to add an extra little surprise for them all. What’s not to love about this new gig?

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Yes, I know it’s going to be extra work, especially on those nights when I have 90 essays that I also need to grade, but to me it is completely worth it. I’ve already gotten several excited messages from my clients about all the cool suggestions I’m making to them. I get to hear their excitement and it makes me want to work twice as hard to make it as perfect as possible. As much as I do love teaching (and despite it being year 22, I still do), I find every minute I spend planning helping people plan their vacations even more exciting! I have a meeting with another client this coming Saturday and I cannot wait!

I love bringing a little extra magic into people’s lives!

 

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Travel Thursday: Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh castle.jpgAlthough I think London is the foreign city that has my heart, Edinburgh is a close second. I don’t know if it is the stunning architecture, the incredible history, the friendliness of the people or the fact that it is just big enough to feel like it would take months to really see it all, but still small enough to feel homey, but I adore it. In fact, despite my sheer adoration for everything London has to offer, if I was really going to pack my family up and move them to a city in the UK, I’d probably pick Edinburgh. London would be the place for me if I was single, but Edinburgh definitely seems more like my speed with a husband and two kids.

Not that I’m moving over seas any time soon (or ever).

I’ve only been to Edinburgh twice, but both time I’ve visited Edinburgh Castle. I guess that’s not really a surprise since both times I was leading a student trip and if there’s a castle or cathedral in the area, it seems student trips will stop there. We actually visited three castles/palaces and three cathedrals during our nine day trip (and one of those days was spent entirely in flight).

Edinburgh viewEven by castle standards, Edinburgh is pretty spectacular, if for no other reason than it has the best view of any castle in the UK that I’ve visited. I love the fact that it is set up on top of the hill. The view is breathtaking. Since I’d already visited the castle three years ago, I didn’t do nearly as many touristy things on this visit. I’d already seen the crown jewels and watched the one o’clock gun fired. So this time I spent a lot more time just walking around and taking everything in. I got to casually stroll through the castle, which was lovely. I spent time looking out over the entire beautiful city. It was such a nice break from neurotically counting my students to make sure they were all accounted for.

It was also nice to have just a bit of time to myself. On these trips, I rarely let students out of my sight, however, since there is only one way in or out of the castle and I knew my students would have no way to get into any trouble or get lost inside the castle, I was able to give them all an hour to just explore and enjoy. Sure, I made them promise to stay in pairs (and most stayed in groups of 4 or 5), but I let them feel a bit more grown up and explore without one of the adults looking over their shoulders. This also meant I got some quiet time to myself. Sure, I could have hung out with the other chaperones, but we’d also been together pretty much nonstop and it was nice to just walk around and take it all in.

The history at this castle is pretty amazing. Even by the old standards of the UK, this castle is old. St. Margaret’s Chapel, the oldest building within the castle walls dates back between 1130-1140. It is so amazing to not only see this building still standing, but to be able to step inside and touch this piece of history. I also have to admit to being more than a little obsessed with the TV show Reign for awhile, and even though I know that about 90% of the “historical” element to the show is bunk, I still loved following the story of Mary Queen of Scots. To me it is so cool to visit the castle where she actually gave birth to her son, James VI.

Although I’m not big on military history, one of my chaperones is a former Marine and he thought it was pretty cool that the Scottish National War Museum and memorial are located inside the castle. He did have a slightly funny moment when he saw what was labelled as a soldier’s privy and thought it might a bathroom set up for military members (as part of a thank you for their service). Since he had to go to the bathroom, he was disappointed to find out it was just a exhibit of what bathrooms were like at the time prisoners of war were kept in the castle.

castle far offSpeaking of bathrooms, the only downside to visiting the castle this time was that I really had to go to the bathroom! I got a little turned around and could only find the bathroom in the cafe. Unfortunately there were only two stalls and the line actually extended out the door, around the corner, up the first set of stairs, onto the first landing and partially up the second set of stairs. I think I spent 20 minutes of my free time in the queue waiting for relief. I was really glad I had not followed the lead of my students and gotten coffees to help warm up on the slightly blustery day.

Long wait for the bathroom aside, it was a great day.

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Teaching Tuesday: AP Scores

AP scores were released at the end of last week. As usual, I was on edge all day. My student scores did not get released until 8 pm, so I watched the message boards as teachers across the country posted their reactions long before I got even a hint about how well my students did on the test. My nerves were up even higher than usual since Trevor Packer’s (the head of College Board’s AP program) tweeted with the score breakdowns almost a week before we got to see our scores. When I saw AP Lang had 57.4% of students who got a 3, 4 or 5, it got me wondering how my students compared.

Even though I shouldn’t, I can’t help but compare my student’s AP scores with the national scores. I also find myself comparing their scores with the scores other students at our school get on completely different AP tests, which is really quite ridiculous. I know I shouldn’t feel inferior when I see my own school tweeting about how wonderful it is that 95% of our AP Spanish students got a 3, 4, or 5 on the test. I should not let that diminish how well my students did or make me think less of myself as a teacher, but at some point, it always does.

My AP Lang students did not do as well on the test as the AP Spanish students did. It’s pretty hard to. But, 78% of my students got a 3, 4 or 5 on the test. However, no one in the district is tweeting about it. This is more than a little discouraging. Especially since last year, despite the fact that 82% of my kids got a 3, 4 or 5 on the Lang test, I was not one of the teachers recognized for having a history of excellent AP scores–even though my AP Lang score has never fallen below 78% and one year all of them got a 3, 4 or 5.

Now, I realize that neither 78% or 82% sound anywhere near as impressive as 95%. However, this year, 88% of all students who took the AP Spanish test (60,000 kids worldwide) got a 3, 4 or 5 on the test. Last year, 89% of the kids who took the test got a 3, 4 or 5 on it. That means, that students at my school did 7% better than the national average this year and 9% better last year (there was a 100% rate last year). This is impressive, however, this year just under 600,000 students worldwide took the AP Lang test. That is ten times as many kids as AP Spanish. Of those nearly 600,000 kids, 57% scored a 3, 4 or 5 on the test. Last year, nearly the same number of kids took the Lang test and 55% of them got a 3, 4 or 5 on the test. My students did 21% better on the test this year and 27% better on the test last year than the national average, which I think is darn impressive and worthy of celebration.

I also had nearly twice as many students take the AP Lang exam as took the AP Spanish exam.

Do I think I’m a better teacher than our AP Spanish teacher? Absolutely not. She is an amazing teacher. Those kids work to earn those scores and both she and her students should be celebrated and congratulated. But so should mine.

And that’s where I get hung up, even though I know I shouldn’t. When I first saw my student scores, before I’d seen the scores of anyone else in my building, I was pretty happy with my kids. Six of my kids got 5’s, six got 4’s and no one got a 1. My kids did 21% better than the national average. Fourteen of my students improved their AP Lang score (from their AP Lit score last year) an entire point. Two of my students improved 2 whole points. That is HUGE progress and a cause for celebration.

But then I saw those AP Spanish scores, the tweets from the school and the message of congratulations on the school website just for that class and it got me down. I wanted to send emails to everyone in my administration office as well as the district administration office explaining just how awesome it is that 78% of our kids got a 3, 4 or 5 on the AP Lang test and why it is every bit as impressive, and maybe even more impressive, as that 95%. I also wanted to include Packer’s message that unlike all the other AP tests, “the knowledge/skills measured by this exam [AP Lang] have a very strong relationship to overall college success.” On the test that specifically measures all those skills kids need to be college ready, our school not only got an impressive 78% of kids with great scores, but those scores are 21% above the national average. We should be shouting this from the rooftop because our kids are amazing and they will succeed!

Instead, I wrote an email to my students and told them how proud I was of them. I told them not to be disappointed if their score was not quite what they hoped for. I reminded them of all they accomplished and how amazing they are. I wished them luck next year, which I seriously doubt they will need. Because even if the district isn’t singing their praises and bragging about them, they are all going off prepared for college. Even the 22% who got a 2 on the exam are not going to struggle in college. They may  have to work a little harder, but they are all going to be ok.

And I have to keep telling myself that that is what really matters. Not a number on a website.

 

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Munchie Monday: Rococo Bee Bar

Rococo Bee BarI know I’ve mentioned it before on this blog, but I am willing to spend rather ridiculous amounts of money on chocolate. Some people go on shoe shopping sprees. Some have an affinity for purses or tools, or for people like my husband, Magic the Gathering cards. I always tease him about the thousands he has spent on cards over the years. He fires right back at me about chocolate. I can honestly say I spend way less on chocolate each year than he spends on his Magic addiction, but that is not to say the chocolate bills don’t rack up.

On my recent trip to the UK, my students joined in on mocking my spending habits. While many of them thought nothing of dropping 30 pounds on clothing from Oxford, 50 pounds on jewelry in London or in one case, over 100 pounds for a cashmere sweater in Edinburgh, when I spent 47 pounds at a chocolate shop in York, it was days before I heard the end of it.

Not that I cared much. I don’t like clothing with logos or names on it, I hardly ever wear jewelry and don’t even want to think about caring for a cashmere sweater! Yes, I’ll take my edible spending habit any day.

When I went into York Chocolate Story, I really, really wanted to take the chocolate tour. York is, after all, a chocolate city. Yes, that’s right. While other cities in the UK earned their wealth from wool or cotton or steel or coal, York has pretty much always been known for its sweet treats. They have a chocolate trail where visitors can follow in the footsteps of chocolate development. This was my kind of city. On our initial walking tour we passed about a dozen sweet shops and I made sure to memorize where the ones that specifically dealt in chocolate were.

Despite my complete love for chocolate, I’ve only ever been on two chocolate tours before, once in Hershey, Pennsylvania and once when my husband and I went on a bourbon themed trip in Kentucky. We found a small family owned chocolate shop that did tours and then tastings of bourbon balls and it was great. I’ve wanted to go on several other tours, but I’m always on vacation when I find them and inevitably no one else wants to go with me. Since I was chaperoning a student group on this trip and they wanted to shop for souvenirs, this tour was another pipe dream for me. Instead, I had to settle for a visit to their cafe and shop.

At least it was a really cool shop with tons of candies to choose from. It was really hard to limit myself. I wanted so many of the delicious looking treats, but I limited myself to a box of filled chocolates from York Chocolate Story, a tin with some sort of amazing looking chocolate bark, three large chocolate bars from various localish confectioneries, a box of six truffles from the chocolate case and one tiny bar from a company called Rococo Chocolates.

Until I grabbed this bar, I had no idea it was “London’s Best Luxury Online Chocolate Shop.” Turns out I managed to miss their actual shop when I was in London. Despite being in Covent Garden twice during my three day stay, I didn’t find them–in all fairness, one of the times I was tied up with a student who was having a panic attack and didn’t get to see anything there. I really wish I’d have gotten to visit the star. While York Chocolate Story did have a decent selection of Rococo’s chocolate bars, they didn’t have any of the specialty Roald Dahl ones and I would have bought at least three of those: one for myself and one for each of my kids who love Dahl’s books.

Basil and limeI grabbed the miniature Basil & Persian Lime dark chocolate bar. I wanted to try this one since it was a flavor combination I’ve never had before. Whenever I am somewhere new, I often try to find truly unique chocolates. Anyone can make a regular old milk or dark chocolate bar (granted with varying degrees of success), but I like to try the more exotic. I’ve had spiced chocolate before, but usually it’s cardamom or ginger or chili. I’ve never had, and I’m not sure I’ve ever seen, chocolate infused with basil. I was also hoping the tartness of the lime might offset the bitterness of the dark chocolate. Although I have gotten much better at appreciating and even enjoying dark chocolate, I still like it best when it is paired with something tart like raspberry, lemon or lime.

The bar itself is very cute to look at. I love the detail of the bee on each section of chocolate. I was wondering why it was called a “bee bar” and while I’m still not sure if there is a connection other than the design, I liked the connection I could verify.

My first taste of the bar was a bit off putting. The basil was VERY strong and the lime marginal. However, as it slowly melted on my tongue, the basil died away and the lime became the lingering note. The dark chocolate was definitely bitter and not that offset by the basil or the lime. It was not an extremely bitter dark chocolate though, so I found it tolerable. On one of my bites I did sort of feel like I was actually crunching on dried herbs–not so much in taste as in texture. I found it slightly unnerving, but not so much that I stopped eating it.

The bar did leave a slightly odd aftertaste in my mouth. It was slightly herby and slightly sour. I definitely wanted a big drink of water after I’d finished with two squares of the chocolate. After that, I still had a lingering taste of chocolate in the back of my throat, but it was just barely there and sort of nice.

I split the other two squares between my kids and they both really liked it. Of course, they are far less picky about sweets than I am. Probably because they are not allowed to blow their allowances on chocolate bars.

Overall:

Taste: 7/10
Appearance: 9/10
Value: 6/10 (at $2.45 this bar is a bit small for the price)

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