Tag Archives: John Barrowman

Wild card Wednesday: Wicked

WickedFor as long as I can remember, I have been a Broadway baby. Musicals are, without a doubt, one of my favorite forms of entertainment. I think it started with the Muppet Movie, which came out when I was an itty bitty child and it has grown from there. I don’t care if it started on the stage or as a movie, if it’s a musical, there is a good chance I love it.

My true love of musicals really hit when I was getting ready to enter 2nd grade and the movie Annie came out. I was enthralled. I had everything Annie–the soundtrack, the sticker books, the dolls…I even had an Annie outfit (which we scrapped together at Goodwill) because when I was in second grade, I was in an elementary musical pageant where we mostly did group numbers, but I was chosen as one of four girls to play orphans in a bit which consisted of four songs from Annie. We all sang and did a choreographed number to “It’s the Hard Knock Life.” One of the Tiffany’s (yes, there were two chosen) sang “Tomorrow,” Melissa got to sing “Maybe” and I got to sing “You’re Never Fully Dressed Without a Smile.” The fourth girl (and second Tiffany) did not get a solo. It was during this moment that my true passion for musicals was developed and I’ve never looked back.

I’d read the book Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire in early 2000. I actually read Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister first. My best friend had gotten a copy from the Half Price Books where she worked and I’d liked it, so I checked out Wicked shortly after. While I wouldn’t call it great literature by any stretch, I thought the retelling to make with witch a sympathetic character was quite entertaining.

When Wicked premiered on Broadway, I heard about it, but the closest the first national tour got to me was Chicago and at that point I’d just moved back to Indiana and didn’t have the time or money to go. I did, however, get a copy of the original Broadway recording and by the time I actually saw my first production of the show in 2009, I knew every song by heart.

Wicked 2I saw the second national tour of the show in Indianapolis at the Murat. Although I’d purchased tickets up in the nose bleed section with two of my co-workers, my best friend heard about the Wicked Lottery and  we’d figure we’d give it a try. At worst, it meant we’d get to hang out downtown for a few hours and have a fun lunch together. At best, not only would we get to hang out and have lunch, but we’d have really close seats for only $25 each. It must have been my lucky day, because mine was the second name drawn and within the hour my best friend and I were sitting in the second row, so close we could actually see the actors spitting as they sang. I’ll admit this was a bit gross, but it also gave me a rather spectacular view of Fiyero, who was played by Colin Donnell. I had no idea who he was at that point, but I knew he was super handsome.

When my co-workers and I saw the play the next week from the far balcony, at first I couldn’t convince them just how cute Donnell was. However, on our way back to our car after getting a late lunch/early dinner after the show, we ran into Donnell and Tom McGowan (of Frasier fame) who played the Wizard enjoying some food at an outdoor table at a local pizza joint. I had a total fan girl moment, but luckily one of my friends kept her cool and asked if she could get a picture with us. They kindly obliged (and signed my program). It was awesome!

Imagine my surprise when a few years later I saw Donnell turn up not only on the briefly lived Pan Am but also as Tommy Merlin on Arrow. Interestingly enough, I met John Barrowman at Comic Con one year and so I have pictures of myself with both Tommy and Malcolm Merlin…but that’s another story.

I went to see Wicked a few years later when it returned to Indy. This time I saw it with a former student who was also obsessed with the show. My son, who was 5 at the time really wanted to go see it with us. Due to my obsession with the soundtrack, when he was three, he too fell in love with it. It was so adorable to sing a duet of “Defying Gravity” with my young son. At one point, he said to me, “Momma, this song is about gravity.” When I confirmed it was, he replied, “I like gravity songs!” I chuckled and asked him if he knew what gravity was. “It’s what holds us on the earth.” I was amazed at my brilliant boy and we sang even louder. Even though my son wanted to see the show, I thought he was a bit young, so I told him I’d take him when he was 8.

Unfortunately, it was not until this year that the show made another stop in Indianapolis. But, it meant that since both my kids were a bit older, I got to take them both. We actually got to see the very last show of the run, on Mother’s Day. It was absolutely glorious. Not only were my kids very well-behaved despite the late hour (they are usually in bed by 8:30 and we didn’t get home until an hour later), they both loved it. My son actually said it was better than two full weeks at Disney World (not that he’d know). They both loved seeing all the bits of plot that connect the songs. They knew all the words by heart, but they hadn’t understood why those songs existed and how the characters were really connected.

They left the theater with a renewed love for the show and for about three weeks, all we listened to in the car was the Wicked soundtrack. Each time my kids would recount details from the show to me, which I loved. I love seeing them as excited about live theater as I am. I’d taken them to a few of the shows my high school put on (Beauty and the Beast, Seussical the Musical and Cinderella), but this was their first real exposure to Broadway theater and they were enthralled.

When I asked my daughter, who is already adores Annie after only seeing the movie if she wanted to see the stage show at a local dinner theater, I got a very enthusiastic (and loud) YES! Even my son, who I was worried might be too old for it, also nodded his head frantically.

I love that I have a set of Broadway babies!

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Free Reading Friday: You’re Never Weird on the Internet (almost)

Never weird on internetI feel the need to be perfectly candid about something upfront in this review: I love Felicia Day. Although not a “gamer girl” myself, I have been immersed in geek culture my entire life, so I relate to her in so many ways. It probably also doesn’t hurt that she was on one of my all time favorite TV shows, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, AND in my favorite web min-series Dr. Horrible’s Sing Along Blog, AND my favorite web series, The Guild. Although I was not overly enamored of her awkward character Vi in Buffy, I simply adored her as Penny and Codex/Syd. I’ve also loved seeing her on Supernatural.

So when I saw her memoir, You’re Never Weird on the Internet (almost) in the display window of my school library, I texted our librarian (school was over at the time) and told her I wanted it first thing the next morning. By the time I’d hit my car though, I was searching the online public library to see if maybe, just maybe, there was an audiobook.

There was. And even better, Day reads the audiobook! I LOVE when author’s read their own works. You get so much more than their stories when they do. You get the emotions that go along with those stories. In a way, it’s like listening to a good friend tell their personal stories. Because the author gets to relive the experience, so does the listener. Not that voice actors can’t do amazing jobs reading audiobooks. I’ve hears some spectacular performances, but an author reading their own work always excites me.

Hearing Day’s stories in her own voice was brilliant. She made me feel just as awkward and quirky and uncomfortable as she felt in so many of her childhood stories. And that was perfect, because I could relate. While I was not home schooled, I grew up in a very strange household myself and I found myself connecting on a very real level with her tales of social anxiety and awkwardness. It probably helps that Day and I are almost the same age, so many of her childhood and teen obsessions were also mine.

I still remember my step-dad bringing home our first computer when I was in 5th grade and the hours and hours and hours I spent playing video games on it. It was so much easier to play those games than it was to deal with real people sometimes. Especially when I was getting ready to start my 5th school in 6 years. Computers were far kinder to new kids than the other students were. Especially when those new kids were a bit chubby, had glasses and were insanely good at school (and serious, serious teacher pleasers to boot).

As an avid attendee of events like Comic Con, I loved Day’s stories of meeting other celebrities because they are so relatable. It’s lovely to see someone I look up to and know I would get a little tongue-tied to meet have the same problems. Her story about going out of her way to buy donuts so she could offer one to Matt Smith (of Dr. Who fame) was hysterical. Considering that until I was in my late 20’s I was the only Dr. Who fan (aside from my dad) I knew, I could see myself doing something similar. Heck, when I met John Barrowman I almost lost my mind. I loved hearing that Day did the same.

I also truly enjoyed reading about Day’s process of staying true to her inner geek by creating her own web series and then her own geek company. I particularly found her message to young, geeky girls inspiring. I wish I’d had someone like her to look up to when I was the only one in my 7th grade homeroom who had seen every episode of Dr. Who and could name all of his companions in order of their appearance on the show. It would have been nice to be able to feel proud of that instead of worried someone would find out just how odd I was. It also would have been lovely to know someone else was writing Fan Fic before there was a word for it. Yep, that’s right, I had notebooks full of Dr. Who Fan Fic back in the 1980’s and early 1990’s!

One of the most interesting and important parts of the book is Day’s account of her experiences during Gamer Gate. After hearing stories like Day’s it is hard to believe anyone could possibly still believe Gamer Gate was not sexism at its ugliest.

I am so glad I read this book and have already recommended it to several of my students, added it to my AP non-fiction list and look forward to talking to students about it.

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